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JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT VOLUME 1 NO 2 OCTOBER 2003

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, INDIGENOUS TECHNOLOGY, AND SELF – RELIANCE IN NIGERIA
BY
DR. O.S. CHIMEZIE

PRICIPAL LECTURER, CENTRE FOR EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY & HOD,
POPULATION & ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION, ALVAN IKOKU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, OWERRI

ABSTRACT
The problem of technology transfer began to attract a serious attention of scholars in the 1970s. Since then, controversies surrounded the concept. On the one hand, there are those who argue that technology cannot be transferred; on the other, there are those who insist that no technological development is possible in the contemporary world without the transfer of appropriate technology. The debate became so keen that in the late 1970s, the of Michigan, Ann Arbor, U.S.A., founded a journal called APPROTECH which sought to explore the dimensions of appropriate technology transfer to the developing countries.
But it wasn’t until the 1980s that the debate began to assume some significance for Nigerians. In Nigeria there seems to be a genuine effort towards the development of indigenous technology and self reliance. In this paper, therefore, the author proposes to examine the linkage between technology transfer, indigenous technology and self reliance. Several questions which he proposes to deal with in this paper naturally come to mind: what is technology transfer? What issues are at stake in technology transfer? What general principles should guide the transfer and growth of technologies in a developing nation like Nigeria? Has Nigeria the basic infrastructures for technology transfer? And how do these questions relate to indigenous technology and self-reliance in Nigeria? What is the role of the government, the universities, the private sector and individuals in the promotion of indigenous technology and self-reliance in the context of technology transfer?
The paper concludes that even if funds, skills, expertise and basic infrastructures may be available, the issue of technology transfer is highly political and requires a political solution precisely because of its new colonial implications. It therefore suggests that the Nigerian government should spell out clearly the type of technologies which will be appropriate for transfer for Nigeria and which will neither inhibit the growth and development of indigenous technology nor undermine the determination for self-reliance.

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